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Showing posts from August, 2017

Tech Tools To Boost Verbal Thinking Skills

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In my recent post from the series on Teaching Computational Thinking, I shared some web 2.0 tools to boost student visual thinking skills. In this post I'm sharing some tools for enhancing verbal thinking skills.

However, it is important to understand that verbal thinking skills should and could by no means be separated from visual thinking skills. They do not exclude each other; quite to the contrary, they are closely interwoven. "They coexist in every mind, and creative impulses emerge when they interact. (Otis, 2016).

According to Repenning et. al (2016), informal doodling on napkins is an excellent example of verbal thinking. But doodling can also include visual elements, just like sketchnoting, a combination of verbal and visual thinking. Besides doodling and sketchnoting, students can use sticky notes to break down information, they can identify problems by writing a storyboard or they can create timelines to verbally organize information. Here are some web tools to bo…

Teaching Computational Thinking: Decomposition

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As described in a previous postthe first stage of computational thinking is decomposition, or breaking down data, procesess and problems into manageable parts. This first stage of computational thinking is also known as problem formulation and it includes problem finding (Repenning et al., 2016). Both problem finding and problem formulation are crucial for computational thinking, because if we want to come up with innovative and creative solutions, we first need to identify the problem to decompose it – to break it down into smaller parts in order to create innovative solutions.

Decomposition can be performed through visual and verbal thinking. Mindmaps, diagrams, spreadsheets and simulations can be used to boost visual thinking. They help students visualize problems and visually organize information. Informal doodling on napkins is an excellent example of verbal thinking. To boost verbal thinking skills, we can also use storyboarding, timelines and sticky notes.

There are many web 2…

Computational Thinking? Yes, but how do I teach it?

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Briefly put, computational thinking is a problem solving process that combines critical thinking with the computing power and as such it represents the foundation for creativity and innovation (ISTE).   Because computational thinking can - and should be applied to all aspects of life, it is an important skill that our students need to master.   But how can we teach it to our students? Are we teaching it already without being fully aware of it? Yes, we are!

I have just stumbled upon a course by Google for Education that provides an excellent explanation as well as lots of resources on how to teach computational thinking.

First of all, to fully understand what computational thinking really means, the course authors break it down into the following four elements:

Decomposition: Breaking down data, processes, or problems into smaller, manageable partsPattern Recognition:Observing patterns, trends, and regularities in dataAbstraction: Identifying the general principles that generate these …